In just 28 days, the people of the United Kingdom will make a choice as to who they want in power for the next five years. It's expected to be one of the closest election results ever and will see the rise of smaller and nationalist parties. One of those smaller parties, UKIP, has enjoyed a wave of publicity over the past 12 months, with some predictions that the anti-Europe party could get 20 to 30 MPs.

As we near polling day, varying opinion polls project that UKIP will only manage to secure 4 MPs at best. One of those hoping to become an MP is the leader of UKIP, Nigel Farage. He is standing in South Thanet, currently held by the Conservatives. One opinion poll shows that he is expected to take the seat 'comfortably', however he's under fire for not being on the campaign trail in the very place he wants, and needs to win.

There is that possibility, and an ever increasing one, that Nigel Farage won't take South Thanet. If he fails to win, he has vowed to stand down as leader of UKIP. The problem UKIP has is that Nigel Farage is the face of the party. They managed to secure two MPs last year in exceptional by-elections, but they were Tory defectors.

There is a fear, pushed by some on the left, that the Conservatives will do a deal with UKIP if no party has overall majority. How exactly do you do a deal with just a handful of MPs? More importantly, what happens if the voice of the party has failed to even become an MP himself?

UKIP might not have to worry about that because since the Scottish Independence Referendum last September, the Scottish Nationalists has grown into wrecking ball threatening to "shake-up Westminster." The SNP, led by Nicola Sturgeon, are on course to win up to 40 seats in Scotland, meaning they could end up the 3rd largest party in the UK.

So for now, UKIP may make the headlines and continue to see themselves as a threat. Come 8th May, the nation will wake to find that the biggest threat came north of the border, and we'll all be left wondering - where did it all go so wrong for UKIP? #Election 2015