We all are well aware of this old adage: Good for the goose is good for the gander. It is time to throw that one out and go for this, updated proverb: What minimizes one big size bowl of lies satisfies all and so does salad.

The latest scientific Research is too good to be accepted at face value; something full of carbs and deeply fried might be a good option next time you cruise past the drive-through. Moreover, it has absolutely nothing or at least not as much as everyone thinks, to deal with barbaric ratios of lettuce to bean dressing which is not quite as likable, we all know.

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But researchers claim that assessing foods in a very personalized manner – rather than proposing a one-size-suits-all diet – may be the basic key to ingesting more healthfully and evading obesity and diabetes.

Why may french fries be healthier for you than salad?

New research has taken all the food lovers by surprise. Eran Segal, Israeli Professor of Weizmann Institute shared a reasonable conclusion after checking the accelerated Blood Sugar amount among eight hundred various people consuming very same meals.

They monitored their sleep habits, physical activity, and bathroom activity to fulfill the paradigms of research. Believe it or not, what they figured out was that individual’s bodies show different reactions to the identical food. What gets the sharp glucose spike in one body might cause no reaction to the lucky ones who can have the entire meal of fries without facing any glycemic response.

Likewise, one sample’s blood sugar surged up while having bananas whereas causing no effect on the blood sugar level after eating cookies.

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Others got the opposite reactions. Justifications for this include the different genetic makeup, microbiome, bacterial ecosystem which triggers a different response to the food. It proposes that diet plans devised to keep the right amount of blood sugar should be tailored individually.

It is all about the blood sugar

Segal claimed the results of the research backs the necessity “to develop personal dietary commendations that might prevent and help obesity and diabetes to be treated properly, which counts among the severe epidemics in our history.” In simple words, one should not believe a diet plan to work well for himself for the fact that it worked well for his friends, his mother or his boss. Thus, we can say for some people fries may be healthier than salads.

"As experts, we frequently deal with very elementary questions," claimed Dr. Eran Elinav, from the Immunology Department. "But as this work is concerned, we are besides very glad to present a possibility that, if further worked upon, would assist billions [across] the world."