According to the Parents Television Council, “13 Reasons Why” is considered to be a “ticking time bomb” for youngsters. This was after the censorship watchdog group asked Netflix to cancel the popular show due to what they called a “horrifying” scene involving rape that turned up in the finale episode of season 2 [VIDEO].

Season 1 saw controversy over the show’s very graphic portrayal of rape, bullying, and most importantly suicide. The scene showing Hannah Baker dead in the bath is probably etched on everyone’s memories. Critics believed that rather than preventing teen suicide, the show might encourage youngsters to do the same as Hannah.

Sensitive viewers warned at the beginning of season 2

As noted by the Independent, when season 2 of "13 Reasons Why" hit TV screens on May 18, it began with a PSA from the Netflix show’s actors, urging their viewers to look for help if they are currently experiencing events similar to those depicted in the show. They went on to warn viewers that season 2 would go on to tackle what they dubbed “tough, real-world issues.” They suggest that sensitive viewers should be accompanied by a trusted adult when watching the show.

This wasn’t enough for the Parents Television Council who has asked Netflix to take “13 Reasons Why" down after the graphic scene in the season’s finale. What makes the scene even worse, is that it involves a gun. Spoiler alert: the finale shows a male character being raped.

This is followed by the same male entering a high school dance holding an automatic rifle. This is thought to be particularly sensitive, due to the recent and deadly school shootings in the U.S.

The watchdog group’s statement goes on to issue a warning about the harmful content in “13 Reasons Why” and goes on to urge Netflix to completely pull the series due to this content. They described the Netflix show as being a “ticking time bomb” for sensitive teenagers and children.

Showrunner speaks up about sensitive scene

Brian Yorkey, the showrunner for the Netflix show, was interviewed by the Hollywood Reporter about the call to take down the series. He said that producers are keen to follow the male character’s journey and to attempt to understand the character’s state of mind and the “state of his soul” in future episodes. Yorkey continued by saying in the following episodes, viewers will try to understand Tyler’s character and why the troubled teen was driven to his difficult choice.

He added that it is Tyler’s journey that is important, rather than the scene ending in what is considered to be the worst possible way. Yorkey added that they did research the gun violence in America before releasing season 2. They tried to make the scenes accurate in their portrayal.