At some point in your life, it's highly likely you'll have to go through an interview to get a specific job. The process itself is enough to make your heart rate increase by a million beats per minute, but when you overcome your nerves it's not all that bad. Things that don't help, on the other hand, are these 10 most common mistakes made in job interviews: #Work

  • Not making eye contact. You don't have to stare into the interviewer's eyes without looking away once, but make sure you keep eye contact; it's said that the most annoying thing for an interviewer is when interviewees look around everywhere, but fail to make eye contact.
  • A weak handshake. You want the job, right? Then show that by putting all your energy into that handshake. Not too hard though, you don't want to pull their arm out of their socket!
  • Not asking questions at the end. It's almost guaranteed that at the end of the interview you'll be asked if you have any questions; always have some prepared. An interview is a two way process and the interviewer loves answering your questions, it's their job, make sure you use them!
  • Talking too much/too little. You have to keep a balance in between; they are not counting how many words are coming out of your mouth, but just make sure it's a sensible amount.
  • Criticising your old boss. This gives a very bad first impression, something you don't want! Also, your old boss might know the interviewer, then you'll definitely be in trouble.
  • Turning up late without letting them know. Your car has broken down, fair enough, you must make sure you've picked up the phone and given them a call to let them know you'll be a bit late.
  • Leaving your phone on loud. Make sure your phone is either switched off or on silent!
  • If you are actually ill, reschedule the interview; don't turn up and give the interviewer a cold!
  • Never turn up to an interview drunk or hungover. Common sense really.
  • Don't play with your phone or anything else under the table! Keep your hands on the table, occasionally moving them for gestures, etc.