The Google Pixel is getting itself into an insanely competitive market, with the iPhone and the Galaxy franchise and others to name, jumping into a market like this is difficult, to say the least. Everyone knows Google, it's the worlds most visited and used search engine website, but few know them for their smartphones. This matters a lot, as reputation in this kind of market means everything.

Why will the Pixel fail?

For many people, buying a smartphone it isn't just about the specs or the design, it's also about the brand. The #Apple logo is priceless (well technically it isn't). Slap an Apple logo onto anything and people will buy it.

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The same goes for #samsung and other companies. By no means am I saying that the #google pixel will be a bad smartphone. It will be a brilliant smartphone for that matter, better than plenty of others within the high-end market, but it lacks the credit that its competitors have.

The Pixel must deal with huge competitors like the new iPhone

When the average consumer sees the Google Pixel, the first thought that pops into their head is: why is Google making a smartphone? And that's where the doubt comes in. Can a company known by billions to specialise in a certain market do just as well in another? I can tell you that in this case, Google has crafted a great phone but the problem is how many take everything at face value. This is natural for all of us. For example, if you wanted to buy a new operating system for your PC and Samsung had just crafted the best, most innovative and critically-acclaimed OS, some would buy it and try it.

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However, many people would stick with what they know best (Windows or Mac) because there's no doubt involved. It's simple but simply true.

Innovation is running dry

Then there's the last point - there's nothing new. The Google Pixel may be faster, have a slightly better camera and OS, but what does it have to offer that you could consider new and innovative? With the days of tech breakthroughs, every year like the touchscreen or the first phone camera, for most, the Google Pixel will just seem like another new phone.

Here's Google's problem: There's no real unique selling point, no jaw-dropping new feature that will captivate a regular smartphone audience. Sure, there will always be some who will appreciate the Pixel's fast processor and camera, but like I said before, the average consumer takes almost everything at face value. This means that when it is visually compared with competitors like the iPhone and Galaxy series, what's the difference? Not to mention the fact that it costs the same as the iPhone 7 and 7 plus. Not many people are going to shell out that kind of money for something that is unknown and new. Google has a real challenge ahead of them, marketing the h*ll out of their new smartphone will help, but will it be enough to make the Pixel a popular option?