Brexit negotiations have been at an impasse since day 1, with the UK government unable to agree on a direction and the figure of the Divorce Bill, despite having reports from experts on how much the UK would owe. Furthermore, constant infighting within the Conservative ranks, including in theresa May's front bench, have also scuppered any coherent plan thus far.

May has looked increasingly weak and her ministers are using every opportunity to undermine her position, the main culprit of this is Boris Johnson. But what has happened with Brexit this week?

The Brexit impasse remains

Following the Following the previous week's negotiations week's negotiations, Theresa May headed to Brussels for dinner with European Commission President, Jean Claude Juncker and Chief Negotiator, Michel Barnier.

Accompanied by Brexit advisor, Ollie Robbins and Brexit secretary, David Davis, she was hoping to use this summit to say that UK-EU transitional arrangement could now get underway. However, the EU state there isn't sufficient progress on three key areas; Irish border, citizen's rights and divorce bill.

Even Phillip Hammond lost his cool this week when he said, "The enemy, the opponents, are out there. They're on the other side of the negotiating table." He later withdrew those comments but it does raise further questions over the cabinet's position. Theresa May also spoke with Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron, begging them to move the talks onto trade agreements. Unfortunately, none of her 'diplomatic tact' worked as the EU leaders remain confused over the UK's position.

Meanwhile in Westminster, trouble could be brewing for the Brexit bill in parliament as a cross-party group composed of Conservative, Liberal Democrat, SNP and Labour MPs seek an amendment to quash a plan for a 'no deal' Brexit, a stance taken by most hard-line Brexiteers within the Conservative Party.

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Theresa May could also face a revolt after Labour have stated that at least dozens of the 300 plus amendments tabled could be passed through Conservative support.