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The incidents in aviation succeed. After the bomb threats released on two aircraft of Turkish Airlines earlier this week, Yesterday, 1st of April, two Boeing 737 from Ryanair collided into each other. The incident occurred at Dublin Airport and has caused delays on some flights. Dublin Airport has confirmed the successful in their official Twitter page and advances that there is no record of any injured.


The aircrafts in question were destined to Edinburgh (FR812 flight) and Zadar (FR7312 flight) and were under the command of the Dublin Airport Control Tower, who instruct them to move towards the runway. In a statement, Ryanair indicates that the two aircraft were slowly moving towards the runway when the wing tip of one of them brushed the tail of the other. So far, it is unknown if the accident occurred due to wrong directions from the Tower or due to the misinterpretation by one of the pilots.


In the same statement, Ryanair announced that all passengers were forwarded to the terminal, and took-off with some delayed. Ryanair also apologies for what happened.


It is the second time a kind of incident happens at Dublin Airport with aircrafts from this company. On 7th October 2014 the story repeated itself. Two Boeing 737 of Ryanair, who were preparing to take off, collided. That day there were no injuries, but both aircraft suffered visible damage. One at the tail of the aircraft, another one in the wings.


Although the successive news of accidents and incidents with aircrafts, a little all over the world do not stop arise, flying remains safe. 2014 managed to be the safest year in aviation history. Flying is today, according to statistics, safer than driving a car, bus or train.

Here are some of the probabilities:

  • The probability of dying when we caught a plane is 0.000014% (the probability of gaining Euromillions is 0.000013% just to have a point of comparison)
  • The mortality rate in commercial aircraft is 0,003 deaths per 100 million passenger/mile (Car: 0.61; Train: 0.06; Buses: 0.05).