The Conservative Party have always maintained that they have increased funding in real-terms for the NHS and whilst this may be true, they have also overseen significant cuts having to be made in NHS Trusts, which run secondary care for those referred to by their GP. With two-thirds of Trusts currently in the red. But what have the #Conservatives promised so far with funding for the NHS and other policies?

There has been less focus on them for public services and much of their focus has been over Brexit negotiations. But this is a mistake from the Conservatives because most people who voted leave, were concerned over public services.

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Promises so far…

The Conservatives have pledged very little in terms of the #Health Service funding and their only policy to date is the replacement of the 1983 Mental Health Act, with new laws that tackle ‘unnecessary detention’ and the pledge for 10,000 new staff for the NHS. They stated that the costs would be covered by a ‘real-term’ rise in funding, despite forecasts suggesting that NHS England will receive no extra funding once the rate of inflation is considered. Plus, the overall NHS budget will take a £5 billion hit despite the ‘extra’ £10 billion given by the Conservatives.

Theresa May has ruled out a VAT rise and has stated they have “no plans” to raise other taxes beyond the election. However, they have failed to commit further on the 2015 pledge that ruled out raises in income tax and National Insurance.

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There are plans to go ahead with raising the effective inheritance tax threshold to £1 million for married couples and civil partners, and with a new transferable main residence allowance of £175,000. However, this will be paid for by reducing tax relief on pensions contributions for people earning over £150,000.

The funding promises are limited from the conservatives and the above policies lack any real substance over funding for the NHS, which is in dire need for an infrastructure overhaul and more funding to cope with the increase of costs of wages, aging population and new and innovative technology.