The British government has abandoned the notion of President #Donald Trump addressing the Houses of Parliament when he visits the United Kingdom later in the year. Inspired by the Commons Speaker #john bercow's speech, countless MPs objected to the idea of Donald Trump addressing parliament due to his 'divisive politics'.

Visit will still go ahead

Trump's controversial visit is still expected to occur despite thousands taking to the streets in protests, but now he is expected to visit whilst parliament is in recess during the late summer or autumn to avoid a formal snub from the Westminster.

A Westminster spokesperson said: 'We are looking at a weekend visit in late summer or September.

Advertisements
Advertisements

The plan is being discussed by the government, the White House and Buckingham Palace. This is the preferred option on our end. We want to accommodate Trump as much as possible'.

Parliament is in recess throughout the summer and is adjourned most of September due to party conferences. Subsequently, if such a plan was to materialise, Trump would not have the opportunity to address parliament.

Bercow refuses to grant Trump permission to speak in the Commons

The news follows the House Speaker John Bercow's insistence that he would not grant Donald Trump the permission to speak in the House of Commons. Bercow's statements put him in hot water with several members Conservative back-benchers, who have started to collect signatures for a vote of no confidence. However, such a motion is unlikely to pass given the reputation Bercow has forged over the years.

Advertisements

Moreover, government officials are said to be keen to limit the President's exposure to the general public to reduce the potential for protests across the country. Since Trump's inauguration, thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets to protest against Trump across the globe. When Trump's #state visit occurs, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has promised to take to the streets to protest Trump's 'divisive politics and misogyny'.

A White House spokesperson said: 'We have nothing to say on the issue'.