Today (27th January) we come together and remember the horror that was #the holocaust. Amidst the Second World War that took place between 1939-1945, the Nazi Party murdered, amongst others, six million Jews. But what can we learn from this and how do we ensure that this never happens again?

The facts

Historians have debated as to the exact dates that the Holocaust lasted for, but the actions against the Jews began in 1933 with the appointment of Adolf Hitler as German chancellor. The History Learning website noted that in 'Mein Kampf' Hitler made plain "his hatred" for the Jews. He #blamed the jews "for all the misfortunes that had befallen Germany".

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Over the course of following few years, the persecution against Jewish people increased and increased. After 1933 the Jews became then 'sub-humans'. By 1934 all Jewish shops were marked with the yellow Star of David and the public were deterred from entering. Soon after, on buses, trains and park benches, Jews had to sit on "seats marked for them". In 1935 the #nuremberg laws were passed. Jews lost their right to be German citizens and marriage between Jews and non-Jews was forbidden. The actions against the Jews reached breaking point with Kristallnacht- The Night of the Broken Glass, where shops owned by Jews were destroyed their contents stolen. The Second World War, which began in 1939, gave Hitler "even more freedom" to bring death and destruction to the Jews. In 1942 discussions were held between Adolf Eichmann, Roland Friesler, Heinrich Muller and Reinhard Heydrich.

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As reported on the Spartacus-Educational website, what was agreed was the 'Final Solution'; a decision to exterminate the Jews in a systematically organised operation. This was carried out between 1942 and 1945 in concentration camps, in which six million Jews were killed.

What can we learn from this?

First of all that it never happens again. This was genocide on an unbelievably evil scale. The actions of the Nazi Party against the Jews must never be forgotten. We must remember, not only those who died at the concentration but also those who helped smuggle Jews out of danger and to safety. The fact that it was so systematic, without emotion or reasoning is what is so horrifying. That an entire nation can do what they did is unforgivable. What was also an abomination was that many people chose to ignore what was happening and refused to help.

How can we ensure that it never happens again?

The key is education. We must educate society and most importantly our children not to hate, not to be racist against another and to accept all as equals. We must come together as a global community and ensure that such an act of pure evil never happens again.