The modern coffee shop is now the chosen hangout for rock climbing meetings, people-watching, alternative interview venues and most things in-between.

This aspect of the catering sector has fought off recession, a growing range of alternatives (vaping cafes being the latest trend), and post Brexit blues. This has not happened without losing some of the homeliness associated with its predecessor - "the good ole café".

There are signs, in more cosmopolitan areas of the UK that #Coffee Shops are overtaking pubs in terms of popularity and places to be seen. Pricing, not just due to inflation - has been the key change in the metamorphosis from café to #Coffee Shop.

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Although establishments such as Café Nero still carry the name - it's arguable that the concept has changed so much that the term café is oft discarded for the cordial tag of coffee shop.

This transition has occurred in-line with drinks menu growth. A drink in a café always had that feel of cheap convenience. The choice was simple; coffee, tea or soft drink. Now there are four times as many choices of just one of these drinks. Selecting your caffeine beverage of choice from the broadening range on offer, is the sort of decision that can keep people awake at night. There are also potentially environmental reasons for increasing your caffeine intake.

Edinburgh an example

There are several cities around the world that turn coffee shops into tourist attractions, rather than being a throwaway meet n' greet synonymous with the café culture that came before it.

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In Scotland's capital city, where you wouldn't think of planning to visit for a caffeine based adventure, but may well end up having one.

Austerity has strangled many an independent business. Edinburgh's caffeine paradise, Cult Espresso not only defies this trend, but it gloriously surfs the coffee shop culture waves. It uses word of mouth to get beyond the fact that it won't exactly bowl you over from the outside, but inside, it'll lock you in with its cosiness built around a dark wood panelled interior. This is one of many examples that can be found in places like Edinburgh, whereby, visiting a coffee shop brings with it the expectation of a relaxing experience.

Austerity has strangled many an independent business. Edinburgh's caffeine paradise, Cult Espresso not only defies this trend but gloriously surfs the coffee shop culture waves. It uses word of mouth to get beyond the fact that it won't exactly bowl you over from the outside, but inside, it'll lock you in with its cosiness built around dark wood panelled interior.

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This is one of many examples that can be found in places like Edinburgh, whereby, visiting a coffee brings with it the expectation of a relaxing experience.

With £2:50 a cup being the norm these days an experience inclusive of Wi-Fi is now more or less taken for granted, in an ever-increasing on-the-go culture.

From convenience to art form

Espresso bars are popping up everywhere as the perfect answer to an increasing on-the-go culture. Pink Lane Coffee in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne turns coffee making into an art form and almost a spectator sport. It takes the leap from a quick fix to luxurious indulgence, in its stride almost justifying the fact that coffee, in some places, costs more than a pint or a glass of wine. This is supported by research into the growing popularity of coffee, with estimates of circa 55 million cups being consumed per week. This country and most of the world has certainly woken up to a coffee culture.